Style File: F G J

Style File:  F G J

Style File:  F G JStyle File:  F G J

F is for Flannel

The term flannel most commonly refers to a woolen cloth that is brushed during the later stages of the weaving process to create a “nap” (a raised pile giving a wonderful softness to the touch). The “flannel shirt”, as popularised by lumberjackts and Nirvana, mistakenly refers to shirts made of tartan and plaid fabrics, rather than flannel cloths.

G is for Gingham

Even if you don’t know the name, you know the design. Gingham is a yard-dyed, balanced check available in an almost infinite array of sizes and colours. It was made fashionable in the 60’s by Mods and remains one of the most popular fabric designs for shirts to this day.

J is for Jigger

If you’ve ever worn a double-breasted jacket or a Peacoat then you’ll have used a jigger, even if you never knew what it was called. The jigger is the button on the inside that is fastened before doing up the buttons on the front of the jacket.

www.rembrandt.co.nz

Guide to white shirts

Guide to white shirts

 

Guide to white shirtsGUIDE TO WHITE SHIRTS

WHEN THE MODERN SHIRT EMERGED IN THE EDWARDIAN ERA, ALL SHIRTS WERE WHITE. TO THIS DAY, NOTHING SAYS “CLASS” LIKE A CRISP WHITE SHIRT EXCEPT, OF COURSE, AN ASTON MARTIN DB9!

Neck size – for best results, always allow for one fat finger between your neck and the collar, and three fat fingers of gin in your glass.

Rib front – some say it was designed to protect the messy eater from hot soup, but others say it was originally created to be the only part of the shirt visible when wearing a waistcoat.

Wing collar – a small, standing collar used for extremely formal occasions – suitable to wear with a bow-tie and a stiff upper lip.

Windsor or cutaway collar – named after the Duke of Windsor and first popularised in the 1930’s, this formal collar can accommodate the larger Windsor knot tie, which can often be the size of a small mammal.

Removable stud buttons – a formal, elegant alternative to buttons, safety pins and sellotape. Note that studs and cufflinks should harmonise – like True Bliss at their peak!

Cufflinks – 3 Wise Men have over 85 different colours and styles in stock, so if you’re indecisive, please take a support

person with you!

Concealed button placket – gives the shirt a definite centre line and makes for a clean finish, like a glass of Marlborough Sav after a couple of dozen bluffies.

Pleated ruffled front – big in the 1970’s but now back, like all those re-formed rock bands that need the money. Ruffle fronts add a little style, interest and panache to your ensemble.

Extra white – now white shirt lovers can go absolutely bonkers with 3 Wise Men’s range of striped, patterned and textured white shirts. Perfect for liberal conservatives!

Buttons – if you wear your top button done up, please wear a tie unless you want to look like Bill Gates’ brother!

 

What to wear to a wedding?

What to wear to a wedding?

What to wear to a wedding?What to wear to a wedding?

While boutiques are inundated with outfit options for women, the choice for men can sometimes be a little difficult to determine – is a waistcoat and bow tie too formal? Do you run the risk of going too casual with your standard go-to checked shirt?

To help decipher the mystery of what a wedding guest should wear, leading men’s designer and clothes retailer Tessuti have put together a few helpful tips to make sure that you not only look the part at weddings, but that you also pull off any look with that essential dose of style.

Dress for the Occasion: Make sure you are aware what kind of theme the wedding will follow before deciding on your outfit. Church weddings generally follow a formal theme – make sure you step out in a crisp suit and shirt combo. Beach weddings usually call for something a little more laid back – think relaxed linens and beige trousers (3/4 trousers may even be acceptable in this case – but check with the bride first!).

Suit Up: With the exception of beach weddings, the majority of weddings do call for formal attire. Even if you live in your chino trousers, for a wedding it is time to up the ante – suit trousers in classic black or charcoal will make sure your look stays smart yet classically stylish.

Add a Pop of Colour: Remember, despite all the pomp and pageantry of a wedding, it’s also a celebration, so don’t be afraid to inject a little fun into your outfit. Add a pop of colour with a pastel coloured tie or lighten up any suit with a bright shirt – Polo Ralph Lauren have a great selection of pastel shirts ideal for looking smart and staying cool.

Don’t Forget Accessories: Just because you’re dressing formally doesn’t mean you have to forgo your own sense of style. Bring any suit and tie combo up to date by styling in your favourite accessories – a designer belt or set of cufflinks will ensure serious style points all day long. ♥

Thanks to www.tessuti.co.uk

 

Tying a tie

Tying a tie

Tying a tieTying a tie

The right tie, properly knotted, can make or break an outfit. An immaculately cut suit, polished shoes, dapper hairstyle and impeccable grooming will all be let down if your tie is wrong!

A few decades ago, every man and school boy worth his salt could knot his tie to perfection. Wearing ties was a way of life. These days, thanks to our more casual outlook in the men’s fashion stakes, ties aren’t a daily occurrence for the vast majority. And isn’t it a funny quirk that many men will ask their woman to straighten their tie, or even make the knot!

With the aid of Victor at Dorset Suit Hire and Chris at Dillon Photography, we’ve put together this simple guide to the most common knots so that you can truly look the part on your big day.

The Four-in-Hand (Schoolboy) knot:

The most common knot. Good for heavier fabrics. Best with collars that have a smaller spread.

• Hang the tie around your neck, allowing the wide end to extend at least a ruler’s length (30cm) below the narrow end.

• Cross the wide part firstly OVER then back UNDER the narrow part.

• Bring the wide end back OVER the front again, then pull UP through the loop.

• Hold the front of the knot with your fingers and slide the wide end down through the front of the knot.

• Hold the narrow end and tighten by sliding the knot up towards your throat.

The Windsor knot:

A wide triangle knot that works in formal settings. Best with a wide-spread collar.

• Hang the tie around your neck, allowing the wide end to extend at least a ruler’s length (30cm) below the narrow end.

• Take the wide end around and behind the narrow end, then pull it up through the loop formed by your collar and the tie and down to the front.

• Bring the wide end behind the narrow part, to the right, then push it through the loop again, forming a triangle in the knot area.

• Wrap the wide end around this triangle, moving from left to right.

• Bring the wide end up through the loop for the third time and pull through the knot at the front.

• Use both hands to tighten and centre.

The Half Windsor knot:

Works with lighter fabrics and wider ties. Best with a standard collar.

• Hang the tie around your neck, allowing the wide end to extend at least a ruler’s length (30cm) below the narrow end.

• Take the wide end around and behind the narrow end, then pull it up through the loop formed by your collar and the tie and down to the front.

• Bring the wide end behind the narrow part, to the right, then push it through the loop again, forming a triangle in the knot area.

• Pull the wide end through the loop again and then pass it through the knot, tightening with both hands.

Bow ties:

• Drape the tie around your neck, extending the right side about 5cm lower.

• Cross the long end over the short end – cross near the neck so that the loop is just large enough to work with.

• Pass the longer end up through the loop forming a simple, loose overhand knot.

• At this point, tighten if necessary.

• Flick one end over your shoulder.

• Pull the dangling end to the left, then fold it back over itself to the right. Hold this fold between your shirt’s collar points – it makes the front loop of the completed tie.

• Drop the end over your shoulder over the front of the bow.

• Grab the left and right sides of the previously folded end and pinch them together in front of the dangling end.

• Feed the middle of the dangling end back through the knot you made – it now forms the back half of the bow.

• Tighten by pulling on opposite sides and halves simultaneously – pull the front right and back left apart to loosen; pull the front left and back right apart to tighten.

• Repeat until the bow is the desired shape and tightness.

Dimples

• To make a dimple, hold the top blade on both edges. Pull it down gently until the top blade starts to tighten. A slight convex will appear close to the knot. Use your thumb and forefinger to press the bottom of the knot into a V and the convex will deepen to form the dimple.

Tips:

Practice on your thigh – easier to see than working in a mirror! Just above your knee is usually about the same thickness as your neck.

For bow ties, think about how you tie your shoe laces – just imagine your head poking out of your shoe where your ankle usually does! ♥

 

Shoe Guide Size

Shoe Guide Size

Worried your shoes won’t fit, especially when ordering from an online site or offshore?

When shopping, it pays to double check each site’s specific size guides as shoe sizes may vary!

Women's shoeWomen’s Shoe Size Chart

 

SIZE US 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
UK 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
EU 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43

 

Man's shoeMen’s Shoe Size Chart

 

SIZE UK 7 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
US 6.5 7.5 8.5 9.5 10.5 11.5 12.5 13.5 14.5
EU 39.5 41 42 43 44 45 46.5 48.5 49.5

Brits Say I Do To ‘Men-Gagement’ Rings

Brits Say I Do To ‘Men-Gagement’ Rings

ringsThe rise of the ‘metro-male’ can no longer be ignored, from man bags to manicures, and with male celebrities such as Stephen Fry and Johnny Depp sporting engagement rings, it appears that modern men have found a new trend.

In response, the UK’s largest jewellery retailer Argos has launched its first ‘men-gagement’ ring collection – offering an easy way for men to show devotion to their partner, what-ever their style. The collection features designs in stainless steel, titanium, sterling silver and gold, and precious and semi-precious stones for added luxury and sparkle.

Alice Rigby, Jewellery Buying Manager at Argos, said: “We’ve seen such a demand for men’s engagement rings that for the first time we have introduced a whole collection for the new season. We believe customers are being inspired by celebs such as Johnny Depp and most recently, QI Star Stephen Fry, who have been photographed proudly sporting their engagement bling. Our new range features a selection of modern metals and designs with more sparkle so whether you’re looking for something understated or eye catching, there will be one for you.”

 

Suiting Up

Suiting Up

suitsSUITING UP

WE TEND TO FOCUS ALL, OR AT LEAST A LOT OF, ATTENTION ON THE BRIDE WHEN IT COMES TO WEDDINGS, BUT IT’S JUST AS IMPORTANT FOR THE GROOM TO LOOK HIS BEST AND FEEL SPECIAL ON THE DAY.

Ready to wear suits are the easiest – walk in, try it on, pay and leave. Some retail outlets will offer a fitting service, but it would pay to check whether that involves a full fitting or merely adjusting hems and sleeve length.

Why not go the extra mile and indulge in a made to measure service. Create something unique to you, the occasion and the theme. A bespoke suit will not only fit you to perfection, it will also commemorate this very special occasion.

Don’t overlook your shirt. A dress shirt made from quality fabric will add the perfect finishing touch. Cheap and nasty will look that way after only a few minutes under your jacket.

The Right Fit

The Right Fit

THE RIGHT FITsuits

When hiring a suit, it’s important that you get the measurements spot on. Before you start, grab a decent tailor’s tape measure, the shoes you’ll be wearing on the day, pen and paper, and have someone handy to help out.

  1. Measure around the neck, approximately where your Adam’s Apple is. Leave a finger in between 3 your neck and the tape measure. Don’t pull the tape measure too tightly.
  2. Raise your arms and run the tape measure right around your body, making sure it is sitting high under your arms and straight across your back. Then lower your arms and take the measurement.
  3. Run the tape measure next to your skin, around the top of your hipbone and below your belly button. This measurement should be taken very firmly.
  4. This next step is easier if you can get someone to help with the actual measuring. Pop on the shoes you’ll most likely be wearing with your suit, or some that are a very similar style and height. Stand straight up, looking forward, so that you don’t slouch. Measure from your waist (where your pants normally sit around your waist) to the top of the heel of your shoes.
  5. Note down your overall height
  6. Note down your overall weight

Now you’re ready to give your measurements to your suit hire company!

www.suitsource.co.nz

Men: What to wear to a wedding

Men: What to wear to a wedding

Grooms: What to wear to a weddingGrooms: What to wear to a wedding

While boutiques are inundated with outfit options for women, the choice for men can sometimes be a little difficult to determine – is a waistcoat and bow tie too formal? Do you run the risk of going too casual with your standard go-to checked shirt?

To help decipher the mystery of what a wedding guest should wear, leading men’s designer and clothes retailer Tessuti have put together a few helpful tips to make sure that you not only look the part at weddings, but that you also pull off any look with that essential dose of style.

Dress for the Occasion: Make sure you are aware what kind of theme the wedding will follow before deciding on your outfit. Church weddings generally follow a formal theme – make sure you step out in a crisp suit and shirt combo. Beach weddings usually call for something a little more laidback – think relaxed linens and beige trousers (3/4 trousers may even be acceptable in this case – but check with the bride first!).

Suit Up: With the exception of beach weddings, the majority of weddings do call for formal attire. Even if you live in your chino trousers, for a wedding it is time to up the ante – suit trousers in classic black or charcoal will make sure your look stays smart yet classically stylish.

Add a Pop of Colour: Remember, despite all the pomp and pageantry of a wedding, it’s also a celebration, so don’t be afraid to inject a little fun into your outfit. Add a pop of colour with a pastel coloured tie or lighten up any suit with a bright shirt – Polo Ralph Lauren have a great selection of pastel shirts ideal for looking smart and staying cool.

Don’t Forget Accessories: Just because you’re dressing formally doesn’t mean you have to forgo your own sense of style. Bring any suit and tie combo up to date by styling in your favourite accessories – a designer belt or set of cufflinks will ensure serious style points all day long. ♥

Thanks to www.tessuti.co.uk

Tying a tie

Tying a tie

Tying a tieTying a tie

The right tie, properly knotted, can make or break an outfit. An immaculately cut suit, polished shoes, dapper hairstyle and impeccable grooming will all be let down if your tie is wrong!

A few decades ago, every man and school boy worth his salt could knot his tie to perfection. Wearing ties was a way of life. These days, thanks to our more casual outlook in the men’s fashion stakes, ties aren’t a daily occurrence for the vast majority. And isn’t it a funny quirk that many men will ask their woman to straighten their tie, or even make the knot!

With the aid of Victor at Dorset Suit Hire and Chris at Dillon Photography, we’ve put together this simple guide to the most common knots so that you can truly look the part on your big day.

The Four-in-Hand (Schoolboy) knot:

The most common knot. Good for heavier fabrics. Best with collars that have a smaller spread.

• Hang the tie around your neck, allowing the wide end to extend at least a ruler’s length (30cm) below the narrow end.

• Cross the wide part firstly OVER then back UNDER the narrow part.

• Bring the wide end back OVER the front again, then pull UP through the loop.

• Hold the front of the knot with your fingers and slide the wide end down through the front of the knot.

• Hold the narrow end and tighten by sliding the knot up towards your throat.

The Windsor knot:

A wide triangle knot that works in formal settings. Best with a wide-spread collar.

• Hang the tie around your neck, allowing the wide end to extend at least a ruler’s length (30cm) below the narrow end.

• Take the wide end around and behind the narrow end, then pull it up through the loop formed by your collar and the tie and down to the front.

• Bring the wide end behind the narrow part, to the right, then push it through the loop again, forming a triangle in the knot area.

• Wrap the wide end around this triangle, moving from left to right.

• Bring the wide end up through the loop for the third time and pull through the knot at the front.

• Use both hands to tighten and centre.

The Half Windsor knot:

Works with lighter fabrics and wider ties. Best with a standard collar.

• Hang the tie around your neck, allowing the wide end to extend at least a ruler’s length (30cm) below the narrow end.

• Take the wide end around and behind the narrow end, then pull it up through the loop formed by your collar and the tie and down to the front.

• Bring the wide end behind the narrow part, to the right, then push it through the loop again, forming a triangle in the knot area.

• Pull the wide end through the loop again and then pass it through the knot, tightening with both hands.

Bow ties:

• Drape the tie around your neck, extending the right side about 5cm lower.

• Cross the long end over the short end – cross near the neck so that the loop is just large enough to work with.

• Pass the longer end up through the loop forming a simple, loose overhand knot.

• At this point, tighten if necessary.

• Flick one end over your shoulder.

• Pull the dangling end to the left, then fold it back over itself to the right. Hold this fold between your shirt’s collar points – it makes the front loop of the completed tie.

• Drop the end over your shoulder over the front of the bow.

• Grab the left and right sides of the previously folded end and pinch them together in front of the dangling end.

• Feed the middle of the dangling end back through the knot you made – it now forms the back half of the bow.

• Tighten by pulling on opposite sides and halves simultaneously – pull the front right and back left apart to loosen; pull the front left and back right apart to tighten.

• Repeat until the bow is the desired shape and tightness.

Dimples

• To make a dimple, hold the top blade on both edges. Pull it down gently until the top blade starts to tighten. A slight convex will appear close to the knot. Use your thumb and forefinger to press the bottom of the knot into a V and the convex will deepen to form the dimple.

Tips:

Practice on your thigh – easier to see than working in a mirror! Just above your knee is usually about the same thickness as your neck. For bow ties, think about how you tie your shoe laces – just imagine your head poking out of your shoe where your ankle usually does! ♥